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This month, Compass selected top shipping news from February.
Let's take a look at roundup of the month’s news:

  • Shippingwatch
    Skou and Habben Jansen: Customers have accepted added fuel charge

    A majority of shippers have accepted the new bunker surcharges in contract negotiations, say the CEOs of Maersk and Hapag-Lloyd, Søren Skou and Rolf Habben Jansen, in interviews with ShippingWatch at the TPM conference in Long Beach, US. "As for the contracts, we're getting the clauses we want included in the contracts," says Maersk CEO Søren Skou. The message is the same from Rolf Habben Jansen, CEO of Hapag-Lloyd. "On the routes where most negotiations have been concluded, we're seeing a majority of our customers accepting the new formula," Habben Jansen tells ShippingWatch.

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  • Shippingwatch
    Maersk chastises scrubbers: "A foolish idea", but increased investment in scrubbers

    Maersk has increased its investment to USD 263 million in scrubbers, despite the fact that CEO Søren Skou categorizes the technology as a "foolish idea." This marks a significantly higher investment than the previously announced amount of USD 80 million last October. CEO Soren Skou remarked, "As long as there is huge uncertainty around the price of low-sulfur fuel, we need to also understand this technology [scrubbers].” He also said that although USD 263 million is a large amount, this will not radically change Maersk's fuel mix going forward. Close to 90% of Maersk's fuel consumption is expected to be low-sulfur fuel according to Skou.

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  • Splash247
    CMA CGM’s latest newbuilds split between LNG and scrubbers

    According to Norwegian broker Fearnleys, CMA CGM, which has ordered ten 15,500 TEU vessels with China State Shipbuilding Corporation (CSSC), contacted CSSC to build five LNG Propulsion priced at $130m per ship. The remaining five will be fitted with scrubbers and priced at $110m per ship. The newbuilds will likely be deployed on the Asia-Mediterranenan tradelane when they deliver from late next year through to 2021. CMA CGM officials declined to confirm the deal.

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  • Lloyd’s List
    Panama-backed study adds to open-loop scrubbers concern

    A MIT study commissioned by Panama into the use of open-loop scrubbers raises “cause for concern” and questions whether ships equipped with the technology are truly equivalent to vessels burning low-sulphur fuel. The MIT research involved “an extensive literature review” that compared seven previous studies on the environmental impact of marine scrubbers from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, the US and internationally. While scrubbers were effective for gaseous sulphur oxides, the study noted that scrubbers may not be as efficient in removing small particulates that are harmful to human health. The findings are very different in emphasis to those of a new Japanese government study being presented to the IMO. It projects that in 10 years’ time any effects from scrubber use in representative coastal areas around Japan would not be significant enough to warrant prohibition.

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  • Lloyd’s List
    ICS: Time to invest in zero-carbon future

    International Chamber of Shipping chairman Esben Poulsson said that the large investments needed to realize zero-carbon shipping should be considered by the IMO during 2020. Mr Poulsson said the chamber wants steps taken to ensure the IMO’s 40% efficiency improvement by 2030 and 50% cut in emissions by 2050 targets are also met. A 50% cut in emissions could not be met by an industry still using fossil fuels, the ICS board believes. The chamber wants the IMO to make the massive investments necessary to realize that the future is a key element of planning in the present.

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  • Lloyd’s List
    Carrier schedule reliability hits record low

    Analyst firm Sea-Intelligence reported that global schedule reliability hit a record low in 2018. “The average schedule reliability across the year was 70.8%, which is not only the lowest in the analyzed period, but is also 3.7 percentage points lower than the 2017 average (74.5%), and 1.8 percentage points lower than the previous lowest schedule reliability of 72.6% in 2014,” said SeaIntel. On an individual carrier basis, Wan Hai was the most reliable carrier, with schedule reliability of 75.9%, and achieved the top slot in five of the 12 months. Maersk and MSC are followed by Wan Hai. The Alliance were in the bottom four, with Yang Ming recording the worst schedule reliability of just 61.8%, followed by Ocean Network Express at 67.7%.

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